Lasers have been used for many years in many different formats, intensity and wavelengths. Class 3 and 4 lasers are used medically and can penetrate cells of the body to create a chemical reaction called photobiomodulation.

This process of using carefully created medical lasers helps relieve pain by releasing endorphins, stimulating injured cells to regenerate, increasing blood flow and reducing inflammation. There is a lot of evidence in human medicine that it can reduce chronic pain, as well as reduce joint inflammation and promote healing. There are few studies yet confirming this same effect in dogs, but it is now a well recognised treatment option for conditions such as wounds, arthritis, muscle strains and sprains and pain

In this simple treatment, a laser wand is used on the affected arthritic area. As the light is emitted across your pet, they often enjoy the experience. The laser gives a warm, comforting sensation and can potentially give instant relief.

A hand-held wand delivers the treatment (goggles protect the eyes of practitioners and patients) and the dosage is applied with a sweeping motion or by using back-and-forth movements as though following a grid while treating one small area at a time. Ideally the pet is sat or laid down on a comfortable mat.

FAQ

  • What about the other medications my pet is on?

Laser can be used safely alongside any other medications. You may even find pain medication can be reduced once the effects of the Laser kick in

  • How do I know if my pet is in pain?

Pets don’t show pain symptoms like we do, they rarely cry out or moan. Some signs to look out for are lameness/limping, changes of behaviour and/or appetite, difficulty settling, and changes in body posture. If in any doubt please see you vet.

  • Does my pet have to be shaved?

No, the laser can be used over the coat. Different setting are used for different coat thicknesses and colour to apply the correct dose

  • How long will a session take?

This depends on the size of the pet, coat type, areas treated and dosing. It can be between 5 minutes for a small wound to 45 minutes for a large dog with multiple areas to treat

  • Will my pet insurance pay for it?

Most pet insurance companies will pay out for Laser but check your policy before booking

 

Laser treatment is often started with 2-3 weekly sessions then dropping in frequency as the patient responds. Many patients can then be ‘maintained’ less frequently to maintain the results.

Each patient will be assessed and a treatment plan will be created to achieve the best results. Laser should only be carried out by a Vet, RVN or trained animal therapist

Contact us today to book in 

 

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